This traveler was hit by a hotel billing error during her getaway to Tucson. Now she wants Consumer Rescue to help.

A hotel billing error ends in a lost chargeback. Or will it?

Linda Ralston has been fighting an expensive hotel billing error for months. Several weeks after her 3-night stay at the Westin La Paloma in Tucson, Arizona, she discovered an extra night’s charge on her credit card. Now her battle seems to have ended in a lost chargeback, with the resort coming out the winner.

But with all the evidence on her side, how did she lose?

Hotel News, guests charged in Arizona hotel for embarrassing reason, embarrassing hotel charges.

I was charged $750 for this embarrassing hotel experience. Can you help?

Elisa Boyd says her experience at a hotel in Scottsdale, Arizona, has been the most embarrassing of her life. This story begins with two friends on a relaxing desert getaway. But it ends with a mortifying accusation by W Hotel employees and a giant post-stay credit card charge.

Now Elisa wants her name cleared and her money returned.

Elisa’s experience is one more to add to the file of hotel guests blindsided by unexpected and dubious post-stay fees. And it serves as a reminder to make sure to leave your room in the same condition you found it. Otherwise, you might find yourself with hefty and embarrassing charges on your hotel bill — and no way to defend yourself.

An all-inclusive resort without anything included? Can Consumer Rescue fix this problem?

Help! Why is my all-inclusive resort missing the most important part?

Sara Hernadez recently found something critical missing from the all-inclusive resort she booked on Priceline: the inclusive part. After booking the Sheraton Buganvilias All-Inclusive Resort in Puerto Vallarta, she received a confirmation for the Sheraton Buganvilias Convention Center. Her rate included a room — but nothing more.

Now Sara wants Priceline to confirm her reservation for an all-inclusive vacation, as advertised. So why is the company blaming the problem on her?

Franchise hotel adds some fake charges to this traveler's bill.

This hotel just hit me with $500 in fake charges. Help!

Could a hotel charge you for fake damage long after you’ve checked out? By the looks of our advocacy team’s files, it seems so.

Imagine this. You’re suffering from a terminal illness and hope to experience some adventures while you’re still able to enjoy them. But then, the COVID pandemic comes along and throws a wrench into your plans. After nearly a year of waiting, things seem to be subsiding, so you take off for a short vacation with your family. Unfortunately, an opportunistic hotel manager has been waiting, too — for unsuspecting guests to hit with hefty fake charges.

What would you do if it happened to you? Give up, or fight back?

If you’re Sherry LaSalle, you choose to fight back — with help from our consumer advocacy team.

Why did Travelocity send this customer to a closed hotel in a remote area of Mexico?

Why did Travelocity make me pay for a permanently closed hotel?

Rosalva Paulino recently used Travelocity to book a pleasant-looking historic property in a remote area of Mexico. However, upon arrival at the location, she was confronted by a permanently closed hotel. Complete with blocked entrances and overgrown vegetation, it was clear the hotel had been shuttered for some time. Bewildered, she scrambled to find alternative accommodations on her own.

Rosalva assumed Travelocity would apologize and quickly refund her prepaid reservation for the permanently closed hotel.

She was wrong. Her shock turned to anger when Travelocity rejected the refund request, claiming the hotel refused to approve it.

Is this the worst booking mistake ever? This traveler wanted a beach, family vacation and ended up in the mountains of Kingston, Jamaica in a business hotel.

Here it is: The worst booking mistake I’ve ever seen

What if you made the worst booking mistake ever — and realized it just moments too late?

Lori Korosek did just that. This novice traveler intended to book a relaxing all-inclusive beachfront hotel in Jamaica for her son and herself. But she accidentally ended up with a nonrefundable, landlocked business hotel that forbids children — located one hour from the beach.

Now Lori is asking our advocacy team if we can do anything about her $1,500 vacation planning gaffe.

Lori’s colossal booking mistake underscores the fact that not everyone should attempt to book their own travel. In this case, a professional trip advisor could have provided critical guidance to this rookie traveler. And although we don’t typically mediate self-created fiascos, Lori has an extenuating circumstance that I found difficult to disregard.

This Expedia customer's reservation at an all-inclusive went all wrong -- to the tune of a $7,000 hit. But who caused this problem?

My Expedia booking went all wrong! How did I end up owing $6,987 extra?

Something went terribly wrong with Catherine Duffin’s last Expedia booking. She used the online travel agency to plan her family’s New Year’s getaway to the all-inclusive Xcaret Resort in Mexico. Assuming the cost displayed on her Expedia confirmation would indeed include everything, she received a shock at check-in. That’s when hotel management asked for not only the over $16,000 she expected to pay — but also an additional $8,000.

This hotel theft charge is outrageous... No one wants a 2 star hotel pillow

Here is the most ridiculous hotel theft charge I’ve ever seen

Now it’s time to reveal the most ridiculous hotel theft charge ever: pillow thievery at a two-star hotel.

During his stay at a Quality Inn, it never crossed Tim Kendall’s mind to steal the mediocre pillows in his room. But that didn’t stop the hotel manager of this franchised property from branding the elderly man a pillow thief — and applying a theft charge to his final bill. And you won’t believe the outrageous value that the manager placed on two standard pillows.

Now Kendall wants our advocacy team to help clear his name. He’s not a pillow thief, and he wants the world to know!

Could a hotel charge you a smoking fee even if you don't smoke? This hotel seems to think so.

How to get a surprise hotel smoking fee reversed? Like this

Getting a surprise hotel smoking fee reversed isn’t easy — even if you’re a non-smoker like Kelsey Russell. Or a determined consumer advocate. But it can be done. Here’s how.

Kelsey’s case is yet another story that illustrates a disturbing trend that seems to be developing in the franchise hotel industry. Increasingly, we’re receiving complaints from guests who say these branded properties have hit them with an array of surprising post-stay charges — no proof included. But, as you’ll see in this case, even when the hotel provides “evidence,”  it might just lead to more questions than answers.